AC/DC – Riff Raff – Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 5

It’s noise making time! Here’s AC/DC’s Riff Raff from the Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 5 exam syllabus.

AC/DC – Riff Raff – Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 5 Drums

Time To Crash!

The first challenge this song presents is crashes during the introduction. The crashes are on the & of 2, & of 3 and the & of 4. Getting these tight with guitars is essential. At 182 BPM that’s no easy task though. Work with a metronome that counts 8th notes and start slow.

All Tied Up

The crashes continue throughout the main guitar riff and are played in sync with the guitar. Be careful with the tied notes during this section; It looks as though the crash and and bass drum are playing the same rhythm but sometimes both the crash and bass drum are tied over the bar line, other times it’s just the crash that is tied, so you’ll have to play the bass drum without a crash.

You Will Be Syncopated

In addition to all the syncopated crashes with the main riff, the verse also features a 2 bar syncopated groove. The unusual part of this groove is that hi-hat and snare drum play the syncopated hits together on the & of 3 and & of 4 every two bars and then there is no hi-hat on the following beat 1. It’s not so hard to execute but if you’re used to keeping a steady quarter note pulse on your hi-hats while playing this kind of groove, it may throw you off a little.

Let’s Go Solo

At the end of the guitar solo we get the chance to throw in a short drum solo. However, we’re not free to play exactly as we want, we need to hit some crashes every 2 bars. If you haven’t attempted this kind of solo before, I suggest starting with some simple 8th note rhythms & getting used to hitting the crashes in time with the band. Then orchestrate those simple rhythms around the kit. Once comfortable with the simple rhythms then try it with more complex rhythms.

Riff Raff Solo Ideas
Create your solo here!

Finally try stringing your ideas together. Here’s some examples, start slow, work with a metronome until you can hit the target tempo of 182 (or even a little faster).

As directed in the score, don’t make your solo too busy, make sure to leave some space – you don’t need to play anything faster than 8th notes really, but a few 16th notes sprinkled here and there can add a bit more excitement. Also, note that on last bar of the solo there is a rest on beat 3 & no crash on the & of 3.

Rock till you drop!

The rest of the song is just a repeat of things you’ve already played and shouldn’t present any problems. Just make sure you can keep your energy up throughout the whole song.

This song is very satisfying to play & offers a chance to really rock out whilst working on your syncopation. Learning how to solo while hitting crashes with the rest of the band is a really valuable skill that you can develop while playing this track.

The 2018 version of the Trinity Grade 5 Rock & Pop book is great to work through if you’re around 3 years into your drumming career. You don’t have to take the exam to benefit from the book. The songs are great to work on & fun to play and will help to improve your drumming. In Singapore you can find the book at Robert Piano – Paragon Shopping Centre (and probably their other outlets). It’s also available from Amazon if you’re happy to pay the shipping!

Don’t forget to check out our youtube channel & subscribe for more videos!

If you’re in Singapore &  haven’t had a free trial lesson with us, sign up for one here!

 

 

 

The Cult – She Sells Sanctuary – Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 2 Drums

She Sells Sanctuary by the Cult is now part of the Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 2 Drums syllabus. Here’s my attempt at it:

The Cult – She Sells Sanctuary – Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 2 drums

Let’s Rock!

This is a fairly straight ahead rock song, the key thing in performing this song is to get the feel correct. It’s time to hit hard. The bass and snare want to provide a solid, steady, unrelenting groove throughout the song. The dynamic for this song only slips below forte (loud) for the breakdown section of the song.

This is a good song to practice playing heel up on the bass drum; it’ll help to get more weight into your groove. Switch to heel down during the quieter breakdown section to help control your dynamics.

Hopefully you’ve been playing your basic rock beats with a metronome and can absolutely nail this song. There isn’t too much about this song that is  challenging, but you need to really commit to the beat & make it rock.

Hard Hitting Hats

To help drive a song forward & make the groove feel heavier and rock solid, rock drummers often accent the quarter note pulse on the hi-hat whilst playing eighth notes. This is achieved by using a whipping motion to generate the strokes that play the downbeats (1,2,3,4) and then hitting the upbeat strokes (the “&s”) as you reset the motion for the next downbeat.

Watch powerful rock drummers such as Phil Rudd (AC/DC), Matt Sorum (Guns n’ Roses, The Cult, Velvet Revolver), Taylor Hawkins (Foo Fighters) or Tico Torres (Bon Jovi) and observe the motion of their arms; you’ll see all of them accenting the quarter note down beat in this manner. Try and copy their arm motion and you should hear more dynamics in your hi-hat playing that’ll help to solidify the pulse of the song and power it forward.

Flams & Fills

The song, like many a great rock song, starts with a flam. It’s a strong statement to make at the start of a song and tells the listener it’s time to rock. Make sure you really nail the timing and get it perfectly on beat four to give a secure & powerful start to the song.

All the fills in the song are performed solely on  the snare drum. As a rock drummer I’ve always loved snare drum fills, they have an aggression to them that you can’t get through hitting tom toms. They may be simple to play and don’t look so flashy, but musically they really make an impact.

The big fill at bar 48 – the end of the breakdown section – is a classic rock fill that you want to have in your vocabulary. It’s been featured in songs by AC/DC, Bon Jovi, Meatloaf, Queen, Poison, Guns n’Roses and countless others. Flams are used again to make it more powerful and to make more of a statement, focus on getting all 3 flams sounding the same.

Did You Find Sanctuary?

Hopefully you enjoy yourself rocking out to this track, it’s one of the simpler songs to play on the grade 2 syllabus, but it’s needs commitment to making the beat feel as good as possible & providing a solid back bone for the rest of the band to sit on.

The 2018 version of the Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 2 Drums book is great to work through if you’re around 6 months to a year into your drumming career. You don’t have to take the exam to benefit from the book. The songs are great to work on & fun to play and will help to improve your drumming. In Singapore you can find the book at Robert Piano – Paragon Shopping Centre (and probably their other outlets). It’s also available from Amazon if you’re happy to pay the shipping!

Check out other Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 2 songs such as:

Under The Bridge – Red Hot Chili Peppers

Knock On Wood – Eddie Floyd

Don’t forget to check out our youtube channel & subscribe for more videos!

If you’re in Singapore &  haven’t had a free trial drum lesson with us, contact us & we’ll arrange one for you.

Red Hot Chili Peppers – Under The Bridge – Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 2 Drums

Here’s a demonstration of Red Hot Chili Peppers Under The Bridge from the Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 2 Drums Syllabus.

Red Hot Chili Peppers – Under The Bridge – Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 2 Drums

As always with the early grades on the trinity rock & pop drum syllabus, we get a cut down version of the song here, but it’s still enough for us to enjoy playing it. Let’s have a look at some of the trickier bits of this song.

A Bridge Too Far?

There are couple of points in the song where the drums act as a bridge between parts of the song. The first one is where the drums first enter the song;  there are 8 bars of guitar intro & then it’s 2 bars of just drums while the guitar sustains it’s last note. There is nothing to lock in with & nothing to help us with the timing. If you use the version of the song with the drums or the click, then it’s obviously easier; but to get a good idea of how your timing is, try the version without the click. Counting may be necessary!

The other time the drums act as a bridge is at the end of the first verse. At this point we’ve been playing for 10 bars and have a good idea of the tempo and how it feels, but the pattern features a slightly more complex left hand part… don’t speed up! Again, while working with the click this shouldn’t be too hard to nail, but try it with the version without a click to get a better sense of how well developed your internal clock is.

Rim Click, Upside Down Stick

One of the areas being assessed for this song is the quality of the rim click sound. To get the best sound from your rim clicks, hold your stick upside down (near the tip) and put the butt end of the stick over the rim of the drum. This will give you a fatter, meatier, fuller sound than if you hold the stick in the normal manner.

Once you’ve finished with the rim clicks you can continue to hold the stick upside down for rest of the song, or you can flip it back over – but you may not want to increase the risk of dropping your stick on exam day. I know many drummers that play with the left stick almost permanently upside down so they can get more power into the back beat on the snare in loud playing situations.

Did You Cross The Bridge?

Most of this song is fairly straight forward, just make sure to focus on playing the rim click & bass drum together on beat 3 during the second verse. I don’t want to hear any flams.

The fills during the finale of the song are not difficult, but again, practice them with a metronome to make sure you don’t rush.

The 2018 version of the Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 2 Drums book is great to work through if you’re around 6 months to a year into your drumming career. You don’t have to take the exam to benefit from the book. The songs are great to work on & fun to play and will help to improve your drumming. In Singapore you can find the book at Robert Piano – Paragon Shopping Centre (and probably their other outlets). It’s also available from Amazon if you’re happy to pay the shipping!

Don’t forget to check out our youtube channel & subscribe for more videos!

If you’re in Singapore &  haven’t had a free trial drum lesson with us, contact us & we’ll arrange one for you.

 

 

 

Pearl Jam – Alive – Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 5

Oh I, oh, I’m still alive… and playing drums…. let’s play Alive by Pearl Jam from the Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 5 Syllabus.

Pearl Jam – Alive – Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 5 drums

Full disclosure is necessary here… I love this song! The first Pearl Jam Album, Ten, totally blew my mind & I spent many hours, days, weeks, years doing my best impersonation of original Pearl Jam drummer Dave Krushen. If I ever want to remind myself of why I love playing drums, I just put this song on and jam along… nothing beats drumming along to your favourite songs!

Is Your Bass Drum Alive?

One of the main areas under examination with this song is the bass drum. Specifically playing the bass drum cleanly and consistently on the 16th notes in between the 8th note hi-hat. Hopefully you’ve been working on this in the lead up to grade 5 & should be comfortable with it before approaching this song. There was a little bit of 16th note bass drum at grade 4, but this is the first time where it’s happening all the way through a song. As always, if you’re in any doubt, slow down the tempo to around 50bpm and work on the grooves slowly until you find them easy to play & then bring them up to speed & beyond.

It’s always good to learn to play things  faster than you actually need to play them so that you are relaxed when you playing them at the necessary speed… playing at your top speed all the time is really taxing!

Are Complex Fills Keeping You Awake At Night?

A number of more complex fills are featured throughout the song. These fills include items such as the drag rudiment, the bass drum,  8th & 16th note rests & 32nd notes. Let’s not panic….

The drags… you’ve been playing drags in songs since grade 3, back then they were mostly stand alone, now we’re just putting them on the front of 16th note fills. All of these can be played using your preferred sticking; for right handed drummers, that probably means your left hand will play the 2 grace notes and your right hand will land the main note on the beat. Make sure that your timing of the 16th notes is accurate, the first note after the 2 grace notes must be smack on time, don’t delay it to make room for the grace notes.

The 32nd notes… there is only one fill with 32nd notes – unless you decide to add an extra one as I did. Moving up & down the subdivisions from 8ths to 32nd notes & from 16th notes to 32nd notes takes a bit of getting used to. Here’s three exercises, to be performed with a metronome, to help out with your timing. Count the 16th note throughout & try with both stickings (left handed drummers can reverse the sticking… and right handed drummers should try that too… work that weaker hand!)

pearl jam - alive - trinity rock & pop
Oh I, Oh, I love playing 32nd notes

Note that I prefer to count 16th notes when I’m playing 32nd notes… you can count all the 32nd notes if you want, but at higher speeds it’s not practical.  I prefer to count the 16th note & feel the 32nd notes between them… if it’s a more complicated 32nd note pattern then I may count all the 32nd notes while learning it & I’d be going really slowly.

The Complexity… When I’m learning a complex fill the first thing I learn to do is play the rhythm of the fill on one surface, normally the snare drum. When I can count it & play it accurately then I’ll start worrying about any sticking patterns or flams & drags or bass drums that need to be applied & then moving it around the kit.

If we break down the big 32nd note fill from the end of the 2nd verse in this manner, then it looks like this:

pearl jam - alive - trinity rock & pop grade 5
Oh I, Oh, I can play this fill!

Step 1:  Just play the rhythm of the fill on the snare and count it out. I don’t tend to count beat 2 when I play this fill, which is why I indicated it in parentheses. You may want to count it. Don’t move on until you’ve nailed this step!

Step 2: Add in the drag at the start. Make sure beat one stays on beat one.

Step 3: Substitute the snare drum on the e of 2 for a bass drum and add the crash to the snare on the & of 2.

Step 4: Add in the Tom-Toms to beats 3 & 4.

Wasn’t so bad was it?

Is It 7/8 O’Clock Yet?

The instrumental portion of the song features 3 bars in 7/8 interspersed with bars of 4/4. You can choose to count these bars either in 7/8 or continute your regular 4/4 counting as follows.

Pearl Jam = Alive - Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 5
Oh I, Oh, I can play 7/8!

If you decide to keep counting in 4/4, don’t venture past the e of 4! If I am going to count this in 7/8, then I will usually count the 4/4 bars surrounding the measure as bars of 8/8. I find this helps smooth the transition to the 7/8 bars. Rather than counting:

1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & 1 2 3 4 5 6 sev

I count:

1 2 3 4 5 6 sev 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 sev

You might find it helps you to make that move smoother too.

When I was practicing this song, I noticed that I was rushing on the last 2 notes of this figure. I think it was because we play a similar figure just before hand as a bar of 4/4. The rest between the last 2 groups of notes is only a 16th note in that figure and not an 8th note.

To remedy this problem of rushing, I start bouncing the heel of my left foot up and down on the hi-hat stand in time with the 8th notes on the bar before the 7/8 figure starts. I then used the physical feedback from my foot to help me keep my timing while playing this figure; hitting the first of the last 2 sixteenth notes at the same time as my left foot heel hits the floor on beat 7 (or 4, if you’re counting that way). It actually helps with the spacing of all 3 groups of 16th notes as you’ll have 1 heel hit between each group & the next group starts on the next heel hit. Try it, you may find it a useful time keeping tool.

A Bridge Too Far?

Now to the part of the song I don’t like… but only for the Trinity version.

The suggested groove for the bridge just feels wrong to me and clashes with what the rest of the band are playing. Now in my video. I played it as suggested and how it’s played in the demo version of the song that trinity supply. I struggled with it though, it just didn’t feel right to me, my body just wanted to play something different.

What should it be?

Alive - Pearl Jam - Trinity
Oh I, Oh, think this groove is better for the bridge!

This is similar to the groove that Dave Krushen played on the original & it meshes much better with the backing track. I don’t know how strict Trinity are when marking the exams. Will you lose points if you ignore their grooves and play something more suitable? During the bridge section you are told to continue in a similar fashion, hopefully this is similar enough that you don’t lose marks for it… if in doubt, force yourself to play the wrong sounding groove they suggested.

Are You Still Alive?

Hopefully you’ll enjoy playing this song as much as I do. For the guitar solo at the end of this song I decided to let go and enjoy myself. Lots of bass drum, crashes, & that extra 32nd note fill – yours  big fill doesn’t have to be 32nd notes. I was just feeding off the energy of the song and I know the original version gets real noisy at the end with lots of crashes, snare drums on all four beats and bass drums on all the 16ths in between… I didn’t go that far… if I record it again I might!

The 2018 version of the Trinity Grade 5 Rock & Pop book is great to work through if you’re around 3 years into your drumming career. You don’t have to take the exam to benefit from the book. The songs are great to work on & fun to play and will help to improve your drumming. In Singapore you can find the book at Robert Piano – Paragon Shopping Centre (and probably their other outlets). It’s also available from Amazon if you’re happy to pay the shipping!

Don’t forget to check out our youtube channel & subscribe for more videos!

If you’re in Singapore &  haven’t had a free trial lesson with us, sign up for one here!

The Specials – Ghost Town – Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 6

What’s so special about this song? Well… it’s about my home town: Coventry, England. Not the most positive song ever written about Coventry I must admit; inspired by rising unemployment, bars and clubs closing down, times of economic hardship… it’s not exactly uplifting! It is however part of the Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 6 syllabus, so lets take a look at it.

The Specials – Ghost Town – Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 6 Drums

Make That Groove Smooth

The main focus of this song is the groove. It features one handed 16th notes played at 74bpm with some 16th note bass drums thrown in to make it sound funky. The tips given in the book for this song indicate that the 16th notes on the hi-hat should be played evenly yet with a bouncy feel. Normally when I think bouncy I think of a shuffle, but this song is not a shuffle. So how do we play evenly yet bouncy?

I believe that evenly refers to the spacing of the 16th notes – they need to be a perfectly spaced  1 e & ah 2 e & ah 3 e & ah 4 e & ah – all notes equidistant apart. To add the bouncy element, I decided to accent the &s on the hi-hat. If you watch my right hand on the hi-hat, you’ll notice that I allow my right hand to drop down a little bit on the &s so the shoulder of the stick catches the edge of the hi-hat a little more and produces a slightly louder, thicker sound than the other three 16th notes. You can experiment with this, you might want to accent all of the 8th notes which another common way of adding movement to a 16th note hi-hat pattern. Whatever you do, just make sure it doesn’t interfere with the even spacing of the notes.

By accenting the offbeat in this manner you also tie in rhythmically with the guitar for most of the song. You may want to experiment with just accenting the offbeats when the guitar is playing the same rhythm.

Woof Woof – Is That A Barking Hi-Hat?

Most of the fills in this song feature hi-hat barks. It’s something you often hear funk drummers doing & we previously encountered in grade 5 with Prince’s Musicology. Working on speed exercises with your feet will help with the execution of this fill. Practice playing 16th notes between your feet until you can get them clean & even.

hi-hat barks - drum lessons in singapore - rhythm house
Prepare to bark

Once you can play clean 16ths between your feet, then you can introduce your right hand hitting the hi-hat hi-hat together with the bass drum.

Hi-hat barks exercise 2
Bark!

If you have been playing clean 16 notes between your feet, then you should now get consistent sounding open hi-hats barking on the es & ahs. Try altering how much you open the hi-hat by controlling it with your foot. Opening it different amounts will give very different results. Normally you don’t want to open it very much at all as you want the hi-hats to sizzle together. The less you open the hi-hats, the easier it will be to do it at faster tempos as your foot doesn’t have to go up  down so far.

Keep working on this until you can get a consistent sound for all the open hi-hats. You can cheat on this by setting your hi-hats to be open just a little bit when your foot isn’t on the pedal. However, I recommend learning to control your left foot though & being able to choose how open the hi-hat is so you have full control of the sound you get.

32nd Note Fills

Unlike most other Trinity rock & pop songs, all the fills for this song are spelt out for us. Most of the fills occur after the hi-hat barks on the & of four and are played as 32nd notes on the snare. The song is at 74bpm, so playing 32nd notes is the same as playing 16th notes at 148bpm. Hopefully you’ve been working on your single stroke roll speed! We only need short bursts of speed for these fills so they should be achievable. Work with a metronome to lock in your timing.

Did You Get Spooked?

This is probably one of the easier grade 6 songs to play as the groove stays consistent throughout the song and the fills are quite repetitive. However, you need to commit to making that groove sound good and to keep it sounding the same throughout the song. Work on playing the hi-hat in a relaxed manner so you’re hand doesn’t get fatigued playing all those 16th notes. Make those hi-hat barks as consistent as possible too.

The 2018 version of the Trinity Grade 6 Rock & Pop book is great to work through if you’re around 3.5 – 4 years into your drumming career. You don’t have to take the exam to benefit from the book. The songs are great to work on & fun to play and will help to improve your drumming. In Singapore you can find the book at Robert Piano – Paragon Shopping Centre (and probably their other outlets). It’s also available from Amazon if you’re happy to pay the shipping!

Don’t forget to check out our youtube channel & subscribe for more videos!

If you’re in Singapore &  haven’t had a free trial lesson with us, sign up for one here!

The Alabama Shakes – Hold On – Trinity Rock & Pop Initial Grade

Have you got the shakes? The Alabama Shakes? Just Hold On for a minute, this video will cure them!

The Alabama Shakes – Hold On – Trinity Rock & Pop Initial Grade Drums

Feeling better now?

Lock It In

This song appears simple on paper, there are no drum fills, no tricky grooves, no open hi-hats… only 2 crashes… just a simple 2-bar pattern… easy. The test here is in locking in with the band.

At the start of the song the acoustic guitar and  the bass guitar are playing the same pattern as our bass drum. We need to try and make it sound like it’s all being played by one person at exactly the same time.

When the verse starts, the acoustic guitar drops out and we’re left to lock in with just the bass guitar. In the middle of the verse the electric guitar starts playing on beats 2 and 4. Your snare drum should be locking in with the rhythm guitar part while your bass drum is still following the bass line.

Are you recording  yourself? Are you listening to yourself? Are you really locked in? Could you get a bit tighter? Try!

Ignorance Is Bliss

Sometimes in songs, some of the instruments play rhythms that may be a counter to ours – slotting in between our main beats on our bass drum or snare. Or they may just give more or less energy to a song. It’s easy to get distracted by these parts, lose our focus, and speed up or slow down with this new energy the part is bringing to the song. You need to learn to ignore these distractions and focus on locking in with the band members that are playing the main rhythm with you.

A good example of where you need to ignore another player is the busy electric guitar part in the chorus of this song. The electric guitar is now playing a busier 8th note pattern over the top of the bass guitar and acoustic guitar. The bass guitar and acoustic guitar are still playing the same pattern as your bass drum as they did in the beginning. However, the busier, louder, more energetic electric guitar gives a new energy to the song and you may find yourself wanting to speed up here. DON’T! Try actively listening to the acoustic guitar and bass guitar rhythm instead and focus on keeping your bass drum together with them.

Take It To The Stage

In live shows, drummers often use monitor speakers, or in ear monitors to hear what the rest of the band (and sometimes themselves) are playing. Often when setting up the monitors, the drummer will have the rest of the rhythm section mixed in louder than the lead instruments to help them focus on locking in with the band. It varies from drummer to drummer and on the playing situation.

To start with you may not have that luxury playing live & I’ve been in situations where the sound engineers have forgotten to turn on my monitors at the start of the show or have forgotten my monitor mix totally & given me a mix where all I can hear is my kick drum or the lead singer… not very helpful when you’re trying to hold down a busy groove with your bassist!

Learning how to listen through the noise to hear the players you need to lock in with is an essential skill to develop. Being able to play one handed and make gestures with the other hand, rude or otherwise, at sound engineers is a skill you’ll also want to develop.

The 2018 version of the Trinity Rock & Pop Initial Grade book is great to work through if you’re just starting your drumming journey. You don’t have to take the exam to benefit from the book. The songs are great to work on & fun to play and will help to improve your drumming. In Singapore you can find the book at Robert Piano – Paragon Shopping Centre (and probably their other outlets). It’s also available from Amazon if you’re happy to pay the shipping!

Don’t forget to check out our youtube channel & subscribe for more videos! We’re adding more videos all the time so don’t forget to check back regularly.

Have you seen our demonstration of all of the songs at the initial grade in our Trinty Rock & Pop Drums Initial Grade Youtube Playlist?

If you’re in Singapore &  haven’t had a free trial lesson with us, sign up for one here!

The Beatles – Come Together – Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 4

Come Togetherrrrrrrrr Right Now… and watch this video:

The Beatles – Come together – Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 4 Drums

What Time Is It? It’s Tom-Tom Time!

The tom-toms play a big roll in this song. From the main riff to the driving verse groove to adding colour during the solo section. Toms are everywhere.

The main riff of the song features 16th note triplets played on the toms. As soon you play this riff everyone should know what song you’re playing, so you’d better get it right! Work on making your 16th note triplets on the toms as smooth as possible – no accents.

Some students get intimidated when they see the 16th note triplets as they are faster than regular 16th notes. But playing 16th note triplets at 82 bpm is the same as playing 16th notes at 110bpm, you should be capable of that by grade 4. Make sure you count to start with & listen to the song and count along with that to get a feel for the speed.

drum lessons singapore
Get your counting together & play this iconic drum lick

DUM dum DUM dum DUM dum DUM dum

It’s indicated on the verse to play with a strong 4 feel. It’s your job to make the 1, 2, 3, 4 really felt throughout the verses of the song. We’re only playing simple 8th notes on the floor tom and quarters on the bass drum. By accenting the quarter note on the floor tom you bring the groove that much more to life.

The song sounds much better with a DUM dum DUM dum DUM dum DUM dum floor tom pattern than with a flat lifeless dum dum dum dum dum dum dum dum. Also, make sure you don’t flam between the bass and floor tom  & keep your bass drum nice & strong too.

Fill In The Blanks

During the instrumental section and the outro of the song you’re given space to choose your own drum fills. They should fit the feel and style of the song. I’d suggest listening to the original and trying to copy Ringo’s style.

He uses a lot of broken 16th note ideas around the toms, and the occasional 16th note triplet fill. For my version I went with a 16th note triplet fill at the very end as an echo of the main riff of the song.

Did It All Come Together?

Hopefully you managed to pull all the pieces together and get this song sounding good. It’s probably the easiest of the technical focus songs at grade 4 – make sure you spend time to make it sound good though!

The 2018 version of the Trinity Grade 4 Rock & Pop book is great to work through if you’re around 2.5 to 3 years into your drumming career. You don’t have to take the exam to benefit from the book. The songs are great to work on & fun to play and will help to improve your drumming. In Singapore you can find the book at Robert Piano – Paragon Shopping Centre (and probably their other outlets). It’s also available from Amazon if you’re happy to pay the shipping!

Don’t forget to check out our youtube channel & subscribe for more videos!

If you’re in Singapore &  haven’t had a free trial lesson with us, sign up for one here!

James Brown – Hot Pants – Trinity Rock & Pop Initial

It’s time to bring the funk! Here’s the Godfather of funk & soul, James Brown:

James Brown – Hot Pants – Trinity Rock & Pop Initial Grade Drums

Nothing To See Here!

So… not a lot happened on the drums in that song….  no fills, no change of groove, no tempo changes, no big ending… nada, nothing, zip…. and that’s the point. Sometimes playing drums is all about establishing a beat and just keeping it grooving so people can dance.

James Brown was known for fining & even firing drummers for playing drum fills when he didn’t want them. All he wanted was for drummers to play consistent, almost hypnotic, grooves for his band to play with and his audience to dance to. While it’s fun to play fills, sometimes they just get in the way & interrupt the flow of the music. Just gimme the groove.

Is It REALLY That Simple?

No, it’s not. The concentration required to stay focused on the beat, not add in fills and to keep the groove consistent, is quite substantial. It’s easy to zone out and lose focus when playing the same beat over and over again.

Trying to make just a simple beat sound consistent for a whole 3 minute song is quite a challenge. Record yourself just playing a simple beat with a metronome for 1 minute, then listen back and listen for variations in speed, kick & bass drum placement & volume. You’ll know when you’ve got it right.

Practicing working on your groove consistency and feel with this song will make big improvements to your overall playing.

Did You Funk Or Flunk?

Hopefully you brought the groove and made it funky… if you didn’t, keep trying! Careful practice and listening to yourself are essential. To help bring the groove to life, try singing the bass drum and snare drum parts to yourself while you are playing it:

Boom    Gak    Boom-Boom Gak

Or add in the hi-hats in the gaps as well

Boom Chick Gak Chick Boom Boom Gak Chick

You might find it improves your feel and helps your concentration. Most drummers can sing their drum parts and often it’s a helpful tool when learning a beat – especially more complex beats. Feel free to substitute in your own sounds for bass, snare and hi-hat.

The 2018 version of the Trinity Rock & Pop Initial Grade book is great to work through if you’re just starting your drumming journey. You don’t have to take the exam to benefit from the book. The songs are great to work on & fun to play and will help to improve your drumming. In Singapore you can find the book at Robert Piano – Paragon Shopping Centre (and probably their other outlets). It’s also available from Amazon if you’re happy to pay the shipping!

Don’t forget to check out our youtube channel & subscribe for more videos! Here’s a playlist of demonstrations of all the songs from the Trinity Rock & Pop Inital Grade

If you’re in Singapore &  haven’t had a free trial lesson with us, sign up for one here!

Guns N’ Roses – Sweet Child O’ Mine – Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 3

Guns N’ Roses’ most famous song is now part of the Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 3 syllabus. So if, like Axl & the gang, you’re wondering “where do we go now?” It’s quite simple… you go to watch the video of me playing the song:

Guns N' Roses – Sweet Child O' Mine – Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 3 Drums

This version of the song is about two and half minutes shorter than the original. Part of the introduction has been sacrificed along with large chunks of the guitar solos (sorry Slash!) and at least one chorus. However it does feature almost all the main drum parts of the song and will certainly help you if you want to attempt to play the whole song at a later date. Let’s look at some of the trickier parts.

Push it!

During the chorus of the song you’re required to play crash cymbals on Beat 1 and the And of two. This second crash provides a lot of forward momentum for the groove and seems to “push” the song forward. The same effect is also often achieved by playing a crash on the And of 4 – Metallica’s Enter Sandman uses that push during the pre-chorus.

You may find it unusual hitting a crash on the And of Two at first; often students are comfortable playing a crash on beat 1 and also beats 2 & 4, but playing on the Ands can feel a bit strange. Hitting two crashes in quick succession can also cause problems. Taking your time to master this & being able to play the crashes with either hand and in any combination will help you to avoid panicking when it comes to playing the crash.

Try playing the crashes using the patterns in the exercise below. If you have 2 crashes, one on the  right & one on the left, have your right hand play either cymbal for extra practice (assuming your kit is set up right handed.)

drum lessons singapore
Crash Practice Patterns

For a bonus practice pattern, if you have 2 crashes, hit both simultaneously to get that true rock star look & feel! In the video I opted to mostly use my left hand & left crash as I find this most efficient and easiest with my setup. Due to space constraints my right crash is right over top of my ride cymbal & makes it tricky to move between the two quickly. Luckily I’m comfortable crashing with my left so I can adapt quite easily. If I was playing the song live, and had space to move my right crash away from the ride, then I would probably play pattern # 3 or #4 as they look good visually.

No, No, No, No, No, No Bad Triplets Please!

The climax of the song features Flams played around the kit using the Quarter Note Triplet Subdivision. Triplets are defined as 3 notes in the space of 2. If we play a whole bar of quarter note triplets, we get 6  quarter notes where previously we had only 4. A lot of drummers learn to play quarter note triplets by feel; I certainly did, by playing along to the original version of the song a lot.

Whilst you can learn it that way, it’s good to be able to practice it away from the song & to know how to develop it. The easy way to get used to this rhythm is to play 8th note triplets using the single stroke roll (starting with the right) and then take away the left hand – then you’ll be left with quarter note triplets – like so:

Quarter Note Triplets - Drum Lessons Singapore
Sweet Triplets O’ Mine

To start with you may just want to move to the left hand away to another surface – the hi-hat, rim of the snare, your leg – so you can hear the sound of the quarter note triplets on the snare. As always, work with a metronome & count – you’ll soon get the feel of it. For bonus points, add the bass drum on quarter notes & you’ll be playing a 6 over 4 polyrhythm!

Where do we go now?

Sweet Child O’ Mine is a classic rock song that every rock drummer has to learn to play at some point. It’s a very commonly requested song for cover bands even some 30 years after it’s release. The Trinity Rock & Pop version provides a good starting point for anyone wanting to learn the song.

Apart from getting good at playing pushes and quarter note triplets, you’ll also benefit from learning the classic fill that appears during the verses. This fill has been used in countless rock songs and essential for the rock drummer to have in their fill vocabulary. You can see it at the 50 second mark in the video.

The 2018 version of the Trinity Grade 3 Rock & Pop book is great to work through if you’re around 18 months to 2 years into your drumming career. You don’t have to take the exam to benefit from the book. The songs are great to work on & fun to play and will help to improve your drumming. In Singapore you can find the book at Robert Piano – Paragon Shopping Centre (and probably their other outlets). It’s also available from Amazon if you’re happy to pay the shipping!

Don’t forget to check out our youtube channel & subscribe for more videos!

If you’re in Singapore &  haven’t had a free trial lesson with us, sign up for one here!

The Beatles – Here Comes The Sun – Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 5

Here comes a video of me playing Here Comes The Sun by The Beatles from the Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 5 Syllabus.

The Beatles – Here comes the sun – Trinity Rock & Pop Grade 5 Drums

This is one of the Beatles most well known songs & is surprisingly complex. On the surface it sounds like a nice simple tune but underneath that simple sounding melody there are some tricky figures and some odd time signatures to contend with.

Let’s Figure It Out

The main figure you’ll have to get comfortable with hits us right as the drums are introduced into the fray & occurs every time the singer sings “it’s alright.” The idea behind the figure is to make it sound like we’ve briefly dropped into 3/8 time by accenting every third eighth note on the snare.

This was not the first song to use this idea, and it certainly wasn’t the last. It’s a very common figure that you should become familiar with. Here it is with 2 forms of counting included.

Here Comes The Sun - Trinty Rock & Pop Grade 5 - Rhythm House Music
Here comes a tricky figure!

Try counting it both ways and see what works for you. Practice with a variety of drum fills at the end of the bar & not just the ones written in the book to help build you’re facility with this figure. Be sure to work with a metronome & make sure you’re ending on beat 1 of the next bar.

What Time Is It? It’s Odd Time!

The bridge of the song features a sequence of bars all in different time signatures. The sequence is 6/8, 5/8, 4/4 and finally 7/8. You get to repeat this phrase 5 times followed by a bar each of 6/8, 5/8 and then back to 4/4.

To help get used to this phrase I suggest listening to the song and counting through this section. It starts at 01:30 in the video. I count the bar of 4/4 as a bar of 8/8 as I find this makes the counting smoother. So rather than counting this:

1 2 3 4 5 6, 1 2 3 4 5, 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &, 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

I count this:

1 2 3 4 5 6, 1 2 3 4 5, 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8, 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

I also always count “7” as “sev” as the extra syllable can cause trouble.

The last two bars of the chorus before the bridge are in 4/4 and 7/8. You may want to count that last bar of 4/4 before the bridge as a bar of 8/8 also.

When you can count along with the song and clap the snare hits then you are ready to try playing it with the song. Listening to the song a lot will help you play this passage more naturally.

Any Clouds On The Horizon?

The rest of the song is fairly simple but the 3/8 figure and the odd time  sequence should give you enough to get your teeth into. Getting this song correct is very rewarding and will give you confidence to tackle more songs featuring odd time signatures in the future – they aren’t so scary once you can count them!

The 2018 version of the Trinity Grade 5 Rock & Pop book is great to work through if you’re around 3 years into your drumming career. You don’t have to take the exam to benefit from the book. The songs are great to work on & fun to play and will help to improve your drumming. In Singapore you can find the book at Robert Piano – Paragon Shopping Centre (and probably their other outlets). It’s also available from Amazon if you’re happy to pay the shipping!

Don’t forget to check out our youtube channel & subscribe for more videos!

If you’re in Singapore &  haven’t had a free trial lesson with us, sign up for one here!